Orchestra country – 10 Nyo http://10nyo.net/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:17:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://10nyo.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-32x32.png Orchestra country – 10 Nyo http://10nyo.net/ 32 32 North Country’s Future Workforce Begins High School Vocational Training | News, Sports, Jobs https://10nyo.net/north-countrys-future-workforce-begins-high-school-vocational-training-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 04:07:09 +0000 https://10nyo.net/north-countrys-future-workforce-begins-high-school-vocational-training-news-sports-jobs/ Destiny Roque, 17, from Malone is one of two girls in the FEH BOCES Building Trades program. (Photo provided – Amy Feiereisel/North Country Public Radio)

In high school, you can take foreign language, calculus, and band classes, but at some North Country schools, you can also learn how to fix a car or build a house. New York’s BOCES, the Boards of Cooperative Educational Services, provide vocational and technical education programs for high school students.

At BOCES Franklin-Essex-Hamilton, based in Malone, there are approximately 150 students. Students are split between programs such as building trades, electrical, and HVAC. These hands-on programs teach students a specific skill set and prepare them to join the workforce right out of high school.

Building houses in high school

Eric Ashlaw, building trades teacher at FEH BOCES, stands in front of the small house his students worked on. (Photo provided – Amy Feiereisel/North Country Public Radio)

Garrett Niles wears a tool belt and leans over a cupboard inside a bright blue ‘Little House on Wheels’. Niles is 17 and a junior in high school. He is one of 35 students in the building trades program here at the North Franklin Educational Center in Malone.

“It’s much better than sitting in a classroom all day” he said. “A lot more fun too. I can actually learn something that can actually help me earn money and other things in the future.

Students come from as far away as Chateaugay, Bombay, Fort Covington, St. Regis Falls and Akwesasne for the program. Niles has a short commute as he lives in Malone. He spends the first half of his day at high school just up the hill.

“I go to school up there, then I go down to BOCES in the afternoon, I work here the rest of the day”, he said.

In addition to the tiny house, the kids also build a 1,500 square foot modular house.

Students from the Building Trades FEH BOCES course work on a modular house. (Photo provided – Amy Feiereisel/North Country Public Radio)

“It starts with a pile of wood in the fall”, said Eric Ashlaw, the building trades teacher. “And at the end of the year, you have something like that, you know, a finished product that someone could live in. That’s pretty cool.”

“Not all children learn from a book”

Ashlaw is 44 years old. He grew up in Malone and went through that same BOCES program as a teenager, then spent 20 years working as a union carpenter.

“Well, I guess not every kid learns from a book. That was me,” he said. “When I was in high school, one of the main drivers of me coming, wanting to come to school, my junior and senior year was coming here.”

Ashlaw started leading the program in 2017, and he says a big motivator for him is preparing students to really get into the field.

“I’ve noticed over the last 10 to 15 years that there aren’t many kids coming out of these programs that I see on the job sites,” he said. “So I wanted to come back and train the kids to get them out.”

Ashlaw said the former students now work for local contractors and for the New York carpenters union, UBC, where the annual salary starts at $35,000 and includes benefits and retirement.

Many students here are considering a career in construction. Niles would like to join UBC. Destiny Roque, one of only two girls in the program, would like to start her own business.

“I like to build for a long time” Roque said. “My dad does it and he starts his own business. So I try to help her too. So it’s nice to learn. I hope to start my own business in the future.

Others, like Jared Sweet, said they joined the program “because they are useful skills.”

“In the future, I can fix things in my own house”, he added. Sweet isn’t sure if he wants to work in construction, but says he enjoys working with his hands.

A place to excel

For children who have always struggled with traditional tests and academics, BOCES Technical Trades programs can be truly empowering and an opportunity to excel in school. Of the dozen students I spoke with during the afternoon, each of them said that “book work” was not their forte. Tehonietathe Sharrow said he had a hard time with his grades.

“Since I got into college really,” he said. Sharrow travels to Salmon River and drives to Malone daily. He says practical work interests him “because I can’t do much on a piece of paper.”

“So true, [this program]It was a relief.” he added.

Savanna Clark of St. Regis Falls said she felt the same way. That’s why she feels good.

“I took workshop courses for three years. It was really good. I liked it. Likes to build projects. For me, it’s just more like a way to bring out a lot of emotions.

Sharrow and Clark were painting a closet together when I spoke to them. They met on the show, and became fast friends. They both said they opened here. Clark said when she came here she was “very antisocial”

“But over time, I started to love, to open up a little more”, she says. “In a building site. You will need to talk to people you don’t really know. And it’s just cool to have friends you meet at different schools. So it was quite an experience this year.

Sharrow and Clark are both juniors, and they say they will definitely be back next year.

The future trades workforce

Eric Ashlaw, the building trades teacher, said his program (and the rest of the Malone FEH BOCES) is good for students, but also plays a vital role in the North Country workforce .

“Our trades workforce is getting to the point where [many of our older workers]they will retire, he said. “And we need people back to their jobs. And there’s so much work right now that we need these guys.

He said that now, at the end of each school year, he answers daily calls looking for workers. And he has them.


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For the future workforce of the North of the Country, vocational training begins in high school https://10nyo.net/for-the-future-workforce-of-the-north-of-the-country-vocational-training-begins-in-high-school/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 11:57:21 +0000 https://10nyo.net/for-the-future-workforce-of-the-north-of-the-country-vocational-training-begins-in-high-school/

Amy FeiereiselFor the future workforce of the North of the Country, vocational training begins in high school

Students working inside the FEH BOCES modular house. Jared Sweet on the far right. May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

In high school, you can take foreign language, calculus and orchestra lessons, but in some schools in the north of the country, you can too learn to fix a car or build a house. New York’s BOCES, the Boards of Cooperative Educational Services, provide vocational and technical education programs for high school students.

At BOCES Franklin-Esse-Hamilton, based in Malone, there are approximately 150 students. Students are divided between programs such as: building trades, electrical and HVAC. These hands-on programs teach students a specific skill set and prepare them to join the workforce right out of high school.

Building houses in high school

Garrett Niles inside the Tiny House.  May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

Garrett Niles inside the Tiny House. May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

Garrett Niles wears a tool belt and leans over a cupboard inside a bright blue ‘Little House on Wheels’. Niles is 17 and a junior in high school. He is one of 35 students in the building trades program here at the North Franklin Education Center in Malone. in the future to earn money and stuff.”

Students come from as far away as Chateaugay, Bombay, Fort Covington, St. Regis Falls and Akwesasne for the program. Niles has a short commute, as he lives in Malone. He spends the first half of his day at high school just up the hill. “I go to school up there, then I go down to BOCES in the afternoon, I work here the rest of the day.”

In addition to the tiny house, the kids also build a 1500 square foot modular house. Eric Ashlaw, the building trades teacher, says “it starts with a pile of wood in the fall. And at the end of the year you have something like this, you know, a finished product in which someone ‘one could live. That’s pretty cool.”

Eric Ashlaw in front of the FEH BOCES mini-house.  May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

Eric Ashlaw in front of the FEH BOCES mini-house. May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

“Not all children learn from a book”

Ashlaw is 44, grew up in Malone and went through that same BOCES program as a teenager, then spent twenty years working as a union carpenter.

“Well, I guess not every kid learns from a book. That was me,” Ashlaw said. “When I was in high school, one of the main drivers for me to come, to want to come to school, my freshman and senior year was coming here.”

Ashlaw started leading the program in 2017, and he says a big motivator for him is preparing students to really get into the field. “I noticed over the last 10 to 15 years that there weren’t a lot of kids coming out of these programs that I saw on the job sites. So I wanted to come back and train kids so that they there.”

Destiny Roque, 17, of Malone.  May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

Destiny Roque, 17, of Malone. May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

He says former students now work for local contractors and for New York’s carpenters’ union, UBC, where annual pay starts at $35,000 and includes benefits and retirement.

Many students here are considering a career in construction. Niles would like to join UBC. Destiny Roque, one of only two girls in the program, would like to start her own business. “I like to build for a long time. My father does it and he starts his own business. So I try to help him too. So it’s nice to learn. I hope that one day I will start my own business in the future.”

Others, like Jared Sweet, said they joined the program “…because it’s useful skills. In the future, I can fix things in my house.” Sweet isn’t sure if he wants to work in construction, but says he enjoys working with his hands.

A place to excel

For children who have always struggled with traditional tests and academics, BOCES Technical Trades programs can be truly empowering and an opportunity to excel in school. Of the dozen students I spoke with during the afternoon, each of them said that “book work” was not their forte.

Savanna Clark and Tehonietathe Sharrow, both juniors in the program.  May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

Savanna Clark and Tehonietathe Sharrow, both juniors in the program. May 2022. Photo: Amy Feiereisel

Tehonietathe Sharrow said he struggled a lot with his grades: “Since I really got into middle school.” Sharrow travels to Salmon River and drives to Malone daily. He says practical work interests him, “…because I can’t do everything on a piece of paper. So really, [this program]it was a relief.”

Savanna Clark of St. Regis Falls said she felt the same way. That’s how she feels good “I took workshop classes for three years. It was really good. I loved it. I love building projects. For me, it’s just more like a way to convey a lot of emotions .”

Sharrow and Clark were painting a closet together when I spoke to them. They met on the show, and became fast friends. They both say they opened up here. Clark said when she came here she was “very anti-social. But over time I started to like it, opened up a little bit more. I really know. And it’s just cool to have friends that you meet in different schools. So it’s been quite an experience this year.

Sharrow and Clark are both juniors, and they say they will definitely be back next year.

The future trades workforce

Eric Ashlaw, the building trades teacher, says his program (and the rest of the Malone FEH BOCES) is good for students, but they also play a vital role in the North Country workforce.

“Our trades workforce is getting to the point where [many of our older workers], they will retire. And we need people to return to their jobs. And there’s so much work right now that we need those guys.”

And he says that right now, at the end of each school year, he answers daily calls looking for workers. And he has them.

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https://10nyo.net/3029-2/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 14:14:43 +0000 https://10nyo.net/3029-2/

Ambition has trumped caution and there are great performances to be enjoyed at UK’s summer opera festivals. Two other large-scale and highly romantic opera houses opened over the weekend. Now halfway through the season, the Garsington Opera offers its first staging of Dvořák , a production which will be the main operatic event of this year’s Edinburgh International Festival. A key factor in Garsington’s high reputation is that he enjoys the Philharmonia orchestra in the pit, and Dvořák’s intoxicating score here vibrates with haunting color under the direction of Douglas Boyd.

The folk tale of the water nymph who longs for human love, only to find that the real world brings rejection and heartache, is open to many interpretations (other productions have offered the rite of passage From a girl to sexual maturity, sex workers attracting men to their loss, even the imprisonment of Josef Fritzl and the rape of her daughter).

At Garsington, director Jack Furness is less interventionist, focusing on the abyss that separates the fairytale from the world of men. A misty lake, in which water nymphs splash, establishes the enchanted atmosphere of the first, while humans live in a Victorian industrial society, divorced from nature. Seeing a deer’s heart ripped out can turn some stomachs just before the all-important dinner interval.

The cast is good and the leading couple especially worth traveling to hear. Natalya Romaniw sings Rusalka with unfailing fervor, although sometimes to the detriment of the beauty of the sound. Austro-Australian tenor Gerard Schneider is an advantageous find, embracing both the poetry and the passion of the Prince. With Christine Rice as the mighty witch Ježibaba, Sky Ingram as the foreign princess, and Musa Ngqungwana singing wondrous warnings as the water spirit Vodník, it’s uplifting to hear an opera on this scale in the theater of 600 places from Garsington to Wormsley.

★★★★☆

On July 19, then on tour, garsingtonopera.org


Desdemona (Elizabeth Llewellyn) and Emilia (Olivia Ray) in ‘Otello’ © Marc Brenner

The same could be said of Grange Park Opera’s . The visceral power of the Verdi Opera could not fail to be thrilling in the recently built of Grange Park opera in West Horsley Place in the Surrey.

Once again, the music was in persuasive hands, the conductor Gianluca Marciano advancing the opera with momentum and step of speed. Where the strength seemed to be lacking was probably because the acoustics of Grange Park favored the singers (the choir sounded powerful), although The Gascoigne Orchestra could also have benefited from additional string players.

If David Alden’s production has left a lingering impression of deja vu, it’s because he has already directed for English National Opera in 2014. It was similar, tense and compelling drama, well-defined characters, a timescale advanced into the 20th century, where Otello and Desdemona’s love is tested in the context of ‘A modern military camp.

Even before the curtain rises, Simon Keenlyside’s Iago is present on the front of the stage. Attract him for is one of the ace of barn park in the peloton this season and Keenlyside delivers beautifully, singing with force, style and a formidable mastery of the text. He brings the character to life from within, as if he is experiencing the drama in the moment. No wonder Verdi thought of calling the opera .

At his side, Gwyn Hughes Jones reaches the heights of Otello with power and intensity, but not always in the Italian way. Between gentleness and dignity, Elizabeth Llewellyn plays a beautifully judged Desdemona, although the vibrato in her voice can be annoying. In the end, Iago doesn’t take flight, as expected. He remains on stage examining the bloodshed he caused – an appropriate conclusion for this IAGO, which was the engine from start to finish.

★★★★☆

grangeparkopera.co.uk

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Ukraine asks EBU to overrule Eurovision 2023 host country’s decision https://10nyo.net/ukraine-asks-ebu-to-overrule-eurovision-2023-host-countrys-decision/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 15:55:15 +0000 https://10nyo.net/ukraine-asks-ebu-to-overrule-eurovision-2023-host-countrys-decision/

Minister of Culture of Ukraine Oleksandr Tkachenko demanded that the EBU reconsider its decision to hold Eurovision 2023 outside Ukraine.

In a statement signed by the Eurovision winners Ruslana and Oleh Psiuk (leader of the Kalush Orchestra) and Mykola Chernotytsky, the director of the public television channel Suspilne, the minister called for further discussions on the organization of Eurovision 2023 in Ukraine. We reproduce it in full below.

“In response to the published statement of the European Broadcasting Union on the impossibility of hosting Eurovision – 2023 in Ukraine, we would like to highlight the following.”

“Ukraine does not agree with the nature of such a decision – as we were faced with the fact without discussing other options. But we firmly believe that we have every reason to continue negotiations in order to find a common solution that will satisfy all parties. »

“We honestly won Eurovision and met all the conditions on time for the approval process for holding it in Ukraine – we provided answers and guarantees on safety standards and possible venues for the competition. “

“Hosting Eurovision 2023 in Ukraine is a strong signal to the world that he supports Ukraine now. We will demand to change this decision, because we believe that we will be able to fulfill all the commitments, as we have done on several occasions. [emphasised to] the European Broadcasting Union.

“That’s why we demand further negotiations on the organization of Eurovision 2023 in Ukraine.”

Ukraine asks the EBU to cancel its decision to host Eurovision 2023

Besides signing the minister’s statement, Suspilne CEO Mykola Chernotytskyi himself issued another one.

“We are disappointed with this decision by the EBU. During this month, a large number of people in Ukraine made every effort to fulfill the conditions for holding Eurovision in our country. Safety is, of course, our first priority. The UA:PBC team, state and local authorities did a thorough job and came up with different options. It is a pity to see such an irrevocable declaration, which is why we ask our partners to continue negotiations.

According to Chernotytskyi, Ukraine had offered three different options: to host in Kyiv, Lviv Where Transcarpathia.

The latter two are close to the borders with Poland, Hungary and Slovakia, and did not come under continuous attack during the war.

Eurovision’s organizing body, the European Broadcasting Union, has confirmed that Ukraine will not host the 2023 contest. the United Kingdom.

What do you think of this decision? Should the EBU reconsider its decision? Let us know in the comment section below!

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From oilfield to country music scene, Kersey’s Johnny Day is making a name for himself in Nashville https://10nyo.net/from-oilfield-to-country-music-scene-kerseys-johnny-day-is-making-a-name-for-himself-in-nashville/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:47:58 +0000 https://10nyo.net/from-oilfield-to-country-music-scene-kerseys-johnny-day-is-making-a-name-for-himself-in-nashville/

Nearly 15 years ago, a child from Kersey came face to face with the inspiration that sparked a fire in his belly and a passion in his heart.

Alongside hundreds of other country music fans, a young Johnny Day stood in the Greeley Stampede Arena as a then-up-and-coming Brad Paisley took the stage and wowed the crowd with his guitar playing and singing.

“I had never seen anything like it in my life. He was sitting up there tearing it up and singing and playing,” Day said. “I was determined to get myself a Telecaster like the one in Brad Paisley and get the same amp as him.”

Day, 28, first became interested in the guitar when he was 12 years old.

“A good friend of mine, his older brother played guitar and I had expressed interest and told my mum about it,” Day explained. “And she went out and bought me a guitar for Christmas that year.”

Day’s mother also helped the youngster get into a band run by a former colleague from King Soopers.

“He was an old man when I met him and he kind of taught me the ropes of live playing. It was just a cover band and I started playing at 13,” said “I played my first show just when I was about to turn 13, so I was super young. They were seasoned musicians and they allowed me to come and play with them.

While Paisley, Keith Urban, Brent Mason and Shania Twain inspired Day to pursue a career in country music, the musician is a fan of all genres of music.

“I love making music. I’m a music junkie; I’m the definition of it,” Day said. “I can listen to orchestral music, jazz music, country music, pop music – I like everything.”

“Every Beer Every Bar” is the next single from Johnny Day’s debut album produced by the GRAMMY nominated duo of Warner Chappell, The 720, Jarrod Ingram and Blake Hubbard. (Photo courtesy of Johnny Day)

As we all know, the music industry is a badass and many artists work full time to help pay the bills while pursuing their music career. The day was no different.

Day took a job with Extraction Oil and Gas, now Civitas Resources, in Windsor where he worked in the oil fields during the week and flew to Nashville every weekend to work on his music.

“I have a favorite list on Southwest,” Day laughed. “I just left the oilfield in May. I had been in the oil fields for about eight years at that time.

While Paisley is now enjoying the fruits of his success which has earned him numerous awards and accolades, Day is working to carve his own path in the world of country music.

As Paisley returns to perform for the 100th Greeley Stampede on Friday, June 24, Day is busy in Nashville working on his debut album and releasing singles.

Day has released two singles, “Wild” and “Left Hand Heavy”, and is working on his third, “Every Beer Every Bar”, written by singer/songwriter Zack Dyer. Dyer wrote the lyrics to Tim McGraw’s “If I Was a Cowboy”, which was released in August 2020.

“Every Beer Every Bar” is a classic country song about love gone wrong about trying to find relief from heartache at the bottom of a beer glass.

“It’s a beautiful image of when I was in my early twenties trying to figure out how to deal with a broken heart and lonely situations,” Day said. “I think it’s a very relevant topic that happens to a lot of people. It highlights that whole period of life where you’re just figuring things out and how to deal with emotions.

“Sometimes you just have to open a cold one and have a little fun and get in the moment.”

Born in Kersey, Johnny Day learned to play guitar like Brad Paisley in high school and started working in the oilfield to support his passion for music.  (Photo courtesy of Johnny Day)
Born in Kersey, Johnny Day learned to play guitar like Brad Paisley in high school and started working in the oilfield to support his passion for music. (Photo courtesy of Johnny Day)

Day worked with The 720 along with Jarrod Ingram and Blake Hubbard to produce the album as well as Warner Chappell’s BJ Hill.

As with many things, the pandemic put a damper on the production and release of the album.

“It was a difficult situation. I had actually recorded a full album with legendary musicians in a legendary studio just before COVID hit,” Day said. “It really put a damper on it all because you couldn’t go out and play your music or promote it.”

Although he couldn’t perform in person, the pandemic forced Day to up his social media game.

“He introduced a new channel on how to get music out into the world. So Instagram and Tiktok really became the way to be successful in this business,” he said. “Which is pretty crazy because it has never been like this. It was a big deal before COVID to have social media numbers, but after COVID, that’s it. That’s all the labels look at. Having those social media numbers is a big problem.

COVID also put the kibosh on Day’s chance to perform in front of local folks at the Greeley Stampede opening for Brett Young in 2020.

“COVID has canceled this show. It’s like one of my big goals, I grew up there my whole life and went to the Greeley Stampede,” Day said. “I will get there, I will play it for sure. But it was heartbreaking.

Country singer/songwriter Johnny Day, inspired by Keith Urban, Brent Mason and Shania Twain, influenced him to pursue his career in music.  (Photo courtesy of Johnny Day)
Country singer/songwriter Johnny Day, inspired by Keith Urban, Brent Mason and Shania Twain, influenced him to pursue his career in music. (Photo courtesy of Johnny Day)

Day has performed numerous shows at venues across the United States, including Bluebird Café and the Key West Songwriters Festival, as well as the Rocky Mountain Country Music Awards in Greeley, where he was nominated for New Country Artist and Performer. of the Year.

“I came to Nashville and I’m doing all of this now because I want to release songs that are real and about real people,” Day said. “That has always been my goal. Just make great songs that really speak to people and give you that inspiration that people can listen to long after I’m gone.

When he’s not recording or playing, Day enjoys spending time with his wife and child.

For more information on Johnny Day, his music and upcoming performances, visit www.johnnydayofficial.com.

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Ukraine will not host Eurovision next year as new ‘confirmed’ host country https://10nyo.net/ukraine-will-not-host-eurovision-next-year-as-new-confirmed-host-country/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:09:00 +0000 https://10nyo.net/ukraine-will-not-host-eurovision-next-year-as-new-confirmed-host-country/

All the buzz

(via Getty Images)

Eurovision bosses in talks with the BBC over hosting the 2023 event in the UK.

The Eurovision Song Contest organizer said it was in talks with the BBC to “possibly host” the 2023 event, after concluding that next year’s contest cannot be held in Ukraine.

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) said in a statement that it had conducted a “comprehensive assessment and feasibility study” with Ukrainian public broadcaster UA:PBC and external specialists as part of the ongoing Russian invasion of the country.

However, he said Eurovision remained “one of the most complex television productions in the world”.

He said: “The EBU would like to thank UA:PBC for their cooperation and full engagement in exploring all scenarios in the weeks following the Kalush Orchestra victory on May 14 in Turin and shares their sadness and his disappointment that next year’s contest cannot be held in Ukraine.

“The EBU has supported UA:PBC in a variety of areas since the invasion. We will ensure that this support continues so that UA:PBC can maintain the much-needed service it provides to Ukrainians.

“Following this decision, in accordance with the rules and to ensure the continuity of the event, the EBU will now enter into discussions with the BBC, as this year’s finalist, to possibly host the Eurovision Song Contest. 2023 in the U.S. Kingdom.

“We fully intend for Ukraine’s victory to be reflected in next year’s shows. This will be a priority for us in our discussions with potential hosts. »

Britain’s Sam Ryder topped the jury vote in Turin, but Ukraine’s Kalush Orchestra won the overall standings after a token show of public support saw them soar to first place with 631 points.

They had been favorites since Russia invaded Ukraine in February – prompting organizers to ban the Russian contender from competing.

Ukraine joined the international competition in 2003 and their three wins make them one of the most successful of the new competing countries – having also triumphed in 2004 and 2016.

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Fun soccer workouts return with sessions across the country https://10nyo.net/fun-soccer-workouts-return-with-sessions-across-the-country/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 05:41:01 +0000 https://10nyo.net/fun-soccer-workouts-return-with-sessions-across-the-country/

McDonald’s Fun Football coaching sessions are back for their second wave, bringing over 800 sessions to England this summer.

The new program will see McDonald’s become the largest grassroots involvement program in the UK, providing one million children with over 10.5 million hours of coaching in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and the Country. of Wales. They are aimed at all children aged 5 to 11, whatever their ability.

Sessions are led by fully trained football coaches, funded by McDonald’s to increase participation in the sport. They take place in the following regions:

cheshire

South Yorkshire

derbyshire

West Midland

Greater Manchester

West Midlands

Nottinghamshire

West Yorkshire

yorkshire

Worcestershire

Essex

Lancashire

Hertfordshire

Merseyside

Northamptonshire

Bristol

Leicestershire

Devon

Buckinghamshire

Gloucestershire

Cambridgeshire

Somerset

Cornwall

Wiltshire

Suffolk

Durham

Oxfordshire

Northern constituency

Eastern constituency

Northumberland

lincolnshire

East Sussex

Norfolk

Greater London

Northern Lincs

Kent

North Yorkshire

middlesex

Surrey

West Sussex

sussex

Central Bedfordshire

These football sessions allow children to get out, have fun and enjoy themselves without being a burden on their parents. Seats are available but limited, so parents should go to mcdonalds.co.uk/football to reserve their child’s spot.

The launch of this historic new program was celebrated at the National Football Museum with McDonald’s Fun Football Ambassadors welcoming some of the first one million children who will enjoy Fun Football over the next four years. Manchester City and England star Jack Grealish, Arsenal and England striker Beth Mead, former England defender Micah Richards, former Team GB and England football captain Cerebral Palsy Jack Rutter and Liverpool and England midfielder Jordan Henderson joined 30 boys and girls as they took part in a special Fun Football session outside Manchester’s iconic landmark.

Jack Grealish said: “I believe football should be for everyone and that’s why I wanted to get involved with the McDonald’s Fun Football programme. Accessibility in sport is something that is close to my heart. personally, I have first-hand experience of how sport can benefit those with additional needs, and it is so important that we support programs that increase opportunities for every child to play and enjoy football “Building a grassroots program like McDonald’s that will give a million kids the chance to play football is amazing and I can’t wait to see the program kick off this summer.”

Along with upgrading the skills of Fun Football providers, the program will recruit over 100 women’s football coaches to support increased girls’ participation. Beth Mead, Lionesses striker and supporter of McDonald’s Fun Football, said: “We already know the positive impact of better representation of women in football. We look at how our performance on and off the pitch can help young girls achieve their dreams and play football. It’s so important that their experience is one that accepts them and having more female coaches present at the women’s sessions will really help with that. I hope that the McDonald’s Fun Football program will encourage more and more young girls to participate and fall in love with a game to which I owe so much.

As McDonald’s Fun Football expands, it will travel to communities that need it most, helping to break down barriers to participation associated with travel to sessions – with the goal of making the program accessible to all families.

“As a parent, I understand how intimidating or off-putting taking your kids to football for the first time can be. The great thing about Fun Football is that the sessions are designed to ensure every level is catered for. supported and accepted. It takes a step back from the competitive environment of football and puts fun at the heart of every session, which is so important. Fun Football is the ideal environment for any child who wants to take their first steps in football and I encourage parents across the country to take advantage of the free sessions,” added Jordan Henderson, McDonald’s Fun Football advocate, parent and Liverpool captain.

McDonald’s is the oldest supporter of grassroots football in the UK and has worked with the Home Nation Football Associations for 20 years. Now in her 20se year, McDonald’s, alongside the Irish FA, Scottish FA and Football Association of Wales, is making its biggest commitment to grassroots football by doubling the size of the new Fun Football programme.

Alistair Macrow, Managing Director of McDonald’s UK and Ireland, said: “Football is at the heart of every community – and after 20 years as a great supporter of grassroots football, no one knows that better than McDonald’s. And now we want to increase our grassroots support to ensure that more children, more families and more communities can directly benefit from the beautiful game.

“Our new program will promote increased access and inclusion, support physical and mental health and, most importantly, generate the community spirit that comes from coaching, playing and watching football.”

]]> Why Country Opera Is Just the Ticket https://10nyo.net/why-country-opera-is-just-the-ticket/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:45:20 +0000 https://10nyo.net/why-country-opera-is-just-the-ticket/

Last Saturday I went to the opera for only the second time in my life. It was at the invitation of David Ross, my former boss of the New Schools Network, who organizes an arts festival every summer called Nevill Holt Opera at his home in Leicestershire. Launched in 2013, it is now a staple of the summer season, with the festival continuing until the end of June. The two operas this year are Bohemian and The Barber of Seville.

Caroline and I were there to see the Puccini, but as anyone who has attended a country house opera will tell you, the production itself is only part of the appeal. Guests are encouraged to arrive early so they can explore the gardens, and the painting that greeted us when we arrived around 4:15 p.m. looked like a scene from Four weddings and a funeral. Men and women in formal attire lounge on picnic rugs sipping champagne as the afternoon sun bathes the surrounding countryside in an amber glow. I half expected a band to pop up and start playing ‘There Will Always Be an England’.

The main event began at 5 p.m. in a stable block that has been converted into a 400-seat opera house, including an orchestra pit. In preparation, I had read Caroline a synopsis of the story of Bohemian on the way, but it had left us both a bit disappointed. Opera in four acts, it begins as a fairly broad comedy, with a romantic plot and sub-plot, then, in Act III, with a lot of cogs, it switches into a tragedy in its own right. Almost all of the characters are penniless artists living in Paris in the 1830s – hence the title – and the theme, as far as I can tell, is that the course of true love never runs smoothly.

“That sounds silly,” Caroline said, and it is indeed. As Sylvia Fine Kaye pointed out, if you don’t speak Italian, you’ll think opera is something important. But when the story was told in song, accompanied by the Manchester Camerata Orchestra, the base metal of the libretto by Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica turned into something magical. The cast was uniformly excellent, especially the two leads, Peter Scott Drackley as Rodolfo and Francesca Chiejina as Mimi. I expected it to have a slightly am-dram feel, having never been to a country opera before, but the whole production was dripping with professionalism. It was really something.

As a novice, I initially struggled to understand the grammar of what was happening on stage. During each scene, the performers constantly moved from telling each other how they felt to expressing their deepest feelings, with the two narratives often at odds. I imagine more seasoned opera-goers can tell right away which feeling is supposed to be public and which is supposed to be private, but I kept thinking, “Wait a minute.” Aren’t you a wee bit worried that when you sang that you were secretly in love with the person standing a few feet away, they might have heard you? But gradually I understood. The clue, as far as I can tell, is that if the characters look into each other’s eyes with a hand on their heart, they are engaged in public declarations of love, but if they’ve turned away and a hand is resting on their head, they are confessing a terrible secret that the other person is not supposed to be able to hear.

One of the best things about the evening was that the intermission lasted over an hour, giving the audience time to consume a three-course meal before the start of the second half. During my five-year tenure as The viewerI never got used to having to wait for the end of the play before having supper and often found myself gobbling down chips in between.

No need for that here. All over the garden, couples and groups of friends were either picnicking on the lawn or seated around tables under miniature marquees. It felt less like a night at the theater than a 50th birthday party for 400 people.

In the car on the way back to London, Caroline said she thought she had left her too late in life to become an opera lover, but I felt I had glimpsed why the people loved him so much. I’m not just talking about the social hype that accompanies it, but about the thing itself. I can see that getting to grips with the art form will take a fair amount of work and mean less time spent watching stranger things and You better call Saul. But I think it might be worth it.

]]> Winners Recognized by Central Okanagan Administrators – Lake Country Calendar https://10nyo.net/winners-recognized-by-central-okanagan-administrators-lake-country-calendar/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://10nyo.net/winners-recognized-by-central-okanagan-administrators-lake-country-calendar/

Outstanding achievements were celebrated on many levels at the Central Okanagan School Board meeting on Wednesday, June 8.

Sports, arts, music and academia were all in the spotlight for administrators to pass on their congratulations to the various winners.

Mike Sodaro

Mike Sodaro

The KLO Middle School teacher received school board recognition for his 16U Barn Owls men’s volleyball team winning a bronze medal at the 2022 Volleyball Canada National Championships in Edmonton.

The club team consisted of players from Okanagan Mission Secondary (OKM) and École Kelowna Secondary (KSS).

Administrators also recognized Sodaro for receiving two civic awards from the City of Kelowna – the Bob Giordano Memorial Award Coach/Sport Administrator of the Year and as the coach of the high school men’s volleyball team. of Kelowna, winners of the Bryan Couling Memorial Award – Athletic Team of the Year.

KSS manager Troy White said the awards are well-deserved for Solaro, noting that personal notoriety isn’t what drives him

“It’s all about the kids,” White said.

Tatum Wade

Tatum Wade

Tatum Wade

A 12th grade student at Okanagan Mission Secondary, Tatum Wade was the recipient of the Augie Ciancone Memorial Award – Young Female Athlete Honor.

Wade told directors she grew up in an athletic family and loved trying as many different sports as she could.

Last year, she played basketball, earned a post-secondary scholarship to the University of Calgary, and was named one of BC’s Top 15 Players to Watch in track and field, long-distance running and ultimate Frisbee, in addition to holding a job and getting the best academic grades in class.

“We’re all proud of her,” said Okanagan Mission High School principal Derek Lea.

Nathan Loo

A grade 12 student at Okanagan Mission High School, Nathan Loo was co-recipient of the Augie Ciancone Memorial Award – Young Male Athlete with Everett Schmuland, a grade 12 student at Kelowna High School who was unable to attend at the school board meeting.

Loo has spent the last year playing basketball, volleyball and track and field.

“For me, I’ve always seen sports and studies as going hand in hand with school,” Loo said.

Loo said the sport taught him the importance of being in good physical shape and empowering himself to see the results of setting and achieving goals all the way.

“I’m very grateful to everyone who has helped me along the way,” Loo said.

Lea noted that Loo is also OKM’s graduate council president and class valedictorian.

“We’re proud to call him a Husky,” Lea said.

Dryden Bennet

Dryden Bennet

Dryden Bennet

The Civic Teen Honor in the Arts Award goes to Dryden Bennett, a Grade 12 student at Rutland Senior Secondary, an award that also comes with a $500 entrance scholarship to the UBC Okanagan Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies.

Bennett became an exceptional musician and composer. In addition to winning Most Inspirational Musician at the RSS in 2021, he plays the first chair trombone for the Okanagan Youth Symphony Orchestra.

He started music in 9th grade with no previous experience and has since become a mature music composer for wind band and symphony music.

He has previously written an original composition, “Tangerine Trees,” which was performed by the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra, and another piece, “Rain at the End of Time,” which was performed by the Youth Orchestra.

“I’m lucky to have an amazing support group at RSS,” Bennett said.

David Wither

David Wither

David Wither

His dedication to helping others earned David Withler, a Grade 12 student at Kelowna High School, the Civic Young Citizen of the Year Award.

“It’s not what David did for himself, it’s what he did for others,” KSS manager Troy White said.

Withler holds a unique title: he is the youngest and most frequent plasma donor in Canada.

In addition to rolling up his sleeves to donate blood, he also supported many community initiatives in 2021, including volunteering at long-term care facilities and helping to raise awareness of the new Plasma Donor Center in Orchard. Park Mall.

Withler is also an avid football player, while mentoring young players and refereeing local games. He also represented Kelowna at the 2019 International Children’s Soccer Games.

White called Withler an exemplary model of the idea that helping others is the most important thing you can do in your life.

Men’s junior volleyball team 18 and under

The team recently won a silver medal at the 2022 Volleyball Canada National Championships in Edmonton under Coach Paul Thiessen, OKM Athletic Director and President of the Okanagan Central School Athletics Association.

The Heat players came from KSS, OKM and Mount Boucherie Secondary, the first time a Kelowna men’s team has won a medal in the Tier 1 division, finishing second in the 32-team tournament.

Kelowna was also one of 350 club teams from across Canada seeded to play for a spot in the national championships.

“It was a huge achievement for a team in a district the size of the Central Okanagan. All the other top-eight teams came from cities with more than one million people,” Thiessen said.

He said six of the team members were recruited by CIS teams while several others will play for collegiate teams this fall.

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Country music trio back at Seymour CityJam https://10nyo.net/country-music-trio-back-at-seymour-cityjam/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://10nyo.net/country-music-trio-back-at-seymour-cityjam/

The second Seymour CityJam show of 2022 begins at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the JCBank Pavilion at Crossroads Community Park, 101 E. Tipton St., Seymour.

Sweet Tea Trio, an all-girl country music trio, will perform that night.

Food and beverages will be available for purchase at The Pines beginning at 6 p.m. and continuing throughout the evening.

There is no admission charge and attendees are welcome to bring chairs and blankets, visit sponsor booths and purchase merchandise from Seymour Main Street as well as the featured band.

In the event of rain, the concert will be moved to Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 655, 122 E. Second St., Seymour. Follow facebook.com/seymourmainstreet for these announcements.

The remaining schedule includes Woomblies Rock Orchestra on July 21, Sounds of Summer: A Beach Boys Tribute on August 18, and Flying Buffaloes on September 15.

The concerts are sponsored by JCBank, The Tribune, Voss and Sons Funeral and Cremation Services and Geocker Construction Inc. as well as junior sponsors Schneck Medical Center, CPR Cell Phone Repair, Family Ford Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, Roger Wessel Berkshire Hathaway, The Pines and SIHO Insurance Services.

Information: Email [email protected]

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